Learn more about one of HDY's newest partners Helen Taylor

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  1. Why did you become a lawyer and why do you keep practising law?
    As a child, I was fascinated by crime dramas like Morse, Miss Marple and other old-fashioned TV series so I wanted to be a detective until I realised how hard working on the beat would be. So I changed tack and opted to study law at University where I ended up enjoying the commercial modules more than the criminal ones. For me, one of the best things about being a lawyer is that I am constantly learning which keeps the job interesting.
     
  2. What has been a highlight of your career?
    I have been working onsite at the Commonwealth Bank of Australia for the past two years advising on the execution of various remediation programs and other regulatory projects. Working in such a dynamic, solution-focussed environment has been fantastic and I have learnt a huge amount from the experience.
     
  3. What inspires you, either personally or professionally?
    I am inspired by people that are determined, resilient and don’t give up in the face of adversity.
     
  4. What Financial Services regulatory developments are you monitoring closely?
    The measures announced in the 2017 Federal Budget including the Banking Executive Accountability Regime. The Regime is supposed to be modelled on the UK’s Senior Manager and Certification Regime but there are a lot of unanswered questions about its scope and how it will be implemented. It could have wide reaching implications for the sector.
     
  5. If you weren't practicsng law, what would you be doing?
    Travelling. I love experiencing new places and cultures and am lucky enough to have visited over 60 countries. Next on the list this year is Namibia and Botswana.

To view Helen's profile please click here.

Upon being admitted as an Australian legal practitioner (expected to be in October 2017), Helen Taylor will become a member of the partnership of Henry Davis York. Helen is currently a Special Counsel admitted to practice in England and Wales.